Of Men Who Were Noble by Penn & by Sword

The interests of a preppy Ivy League alumnus (Penn '13) and in-coming graduate student (Penn '16). Pennsylvanians often have a "collegiate inferiority complex", thus I am hoping to foster a bit of Penn Pride on Tumblr.

Playboy Magazine Names UPenn Top Party School In The Country

The University of Pennsylvania's motto has evolved somewhat over the years.  It started out as “Sine moribus vanæ” (“Without morals there is only vanity”) being from a line in the Roman poet Horace's Third Ode.  This was usually placed in the seal under a stack of books representing Theology, Astronomy, Natural Philosophy, Mathematics, Logic, Rhetoric, and Grammar, implying that knowledge or learning without morals is in vain.  In the late 1800s some students had a little fun and distributed a bogus program at a University event.  Contained in the programs was a rewording of the motto as “Puellæ sine moribus vanæ” (“Loose women without morals”) accompanied by the above illustration depicting a diploma, text books, the 'lamp of learning', and a mortarboard along with a seductive-looking woman surrounded by the school motto.  Apparently the University Trustees were so distressed that they added “Litteræ” to the beginning of the motto so that it read “Learning without morals is in vain.”  This is still used on the official Seal of the Trustees, which can be found on all Pennsylvania diplomas.  It was only in 1932 that the current motto “Leges sine moribus vanæ” (“Laws without morals are in vain”) became official.  This version had been used unofficially throughout the 19th century.

The University of Pennsylvania's motto has evolved somewhat over the years.  It started out as “Sine moribus vanæ” (“Without morals there is only vanity”) being from a line in the Roman poet Horace's Third Ode.  This was usually placed in the seal under a stack of books representing Theology, Astronomy, Natural Philosophy, Mathematics, Logic, Rhetoric, and Grammar, implying that knowledge or learning without morals is in vain.  In the late 1800s some students had a little fun and distributed a bogus program at a University event.  Contained in the programs was a rewording of the motto as “Puellæ sine moribus vanæ” (“Loose women without morals”) accompanied by the above illustration depicting a diploma, text books, the 'lamp of learning', and a mortarboard along with a seductive-looking woman surrounded by the school motto.  Apparently the University Trustees were so distressed that they added “Litteræ” to the beginning of the motto so that it read “Learning without morals is in vain.”  This is still used on the official Seal of the Trustees, which can be found on all Pennsylvania diplomas.  It was only in 1932 that the current motto “Leges sine moribus vanæ” (“Laws without morals are in vain”) became official.  This version had been used unofficially throughout the 19th century.

My apologies for not posting anything over the last few months.  I have been busy with starting preparatory coursework for my graduate programme at Penn, and also with training and working as a Graduate Associate in one of the dorms on campus.  Here’s an image from the University of Pennsylvania 1905 Calendar as illustrated by Thornton Oakley.

Apologies

Sorry for not having posted anything in a while.  My intensive Arabic class (one full year of introductory Arabic taught in six weeks) has been so much work I’ve barely had time for anything else.  The final is to-morrow so I’ll be posting regularly again soon.

Feast Days of May according to the Anglican Kalendar (used in the American Episcopal Church). From “My Book of the Church’s Year” by Enid M. Chadwick.

 “…He suddenly ordered his horse to be saddled, as he must immediately return to Cambridge. On being asked the cause of his abrupt departure, he replied, that he had received word that the students there had raised the Evil One…” —from The Life of Henry Dunster, First President of Harvard College by the Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin
In a rare case of history repeating itself, a reënactment of a Satanic Black Mass will be held at the Queen’s Head Pub in the basement of Memorial Hall at Harvard University.  The reënactment is part of a series of events being sponsored by the Harvard Extension School’s Cultural Studies Club.  The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston has asked for the Black Mass to be banned because it mocks the Catholic Mass, however, Harvard President Dr. Drew Gilpin Faust (yes, her name is Dr. Faust), formerly a member of the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, has refused citing ‘educational freedom’ and the pursuit of knowledge.  The full article can be read by clicking HERE.

“…He suddenly ordered his horse to be saddled, as he must immediately return to Cambridge. On being asked the cause of his abrupt departure, he replied, that he had received word that the students there had raised the Evil One…” —from The Life of Henry Dunster, First President of Harvard College by the Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin

In a rare case of history repeating itself, a reënactment of a Satanic Black Mass will be held at the Queen’s Head Pub in the basement of Memorial Hall at Harvard University.  The reënactment is part of a series of events being sponsored by the Harvard Extension School’s Cultural Studies Club.  The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston has asked for the Black Mass to be banned because it mocks the Catholic Mass, however, Harvard President Dr. Drew Gilpin Faust (yes, her name is Dr. Faust), formerly a member of the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, has refused citing ‘educational freedom’ and the pursuit of knowledge.  The full article can be read by clicking HERE.

In honor of Hey Day at the University of Pennsylvania, here’s a photo of some vintage canes.

In honor of Hey Day at the University of Pennsylvania, here’s a photo of some vintage canes.

Vintage award medals from the Penn Relays Carnival, the largest track and field competition in the nation outside of the National Championship and the Olympic Games, held annually for the last one hundred & twenty years at the University of Pennsylvania.

Easter Sunday and the following Sundays in Easter-tide according to the Anglican Kalendar (used in the American Episcopal Church). From “My Book of the Church’s Year” by Enid M. Chadwick.

The One Hundred & Twentieth Annual Penn Relays Carnival begins this Thursday on Franklin Field, here at the University of Pennsylvania.  The Penn Relays are the largest track and field event in the nation outside of the Olympics and the National Championship. Get your tickets by clicking: HERE.

The One Hundred & Twentieth Annual Penn Relays Carnival begins this Thursday on Franklin Field, here at the University of Pennsylvania.  The Penn Relays are the largest track and field event in the nation outside of the Olympics and the National Championship. Get your tickets by clicking: HERE.

The Sacred Triduum of Holy Week began to-day at Evensong in the Anglican Kalendar (used in the American Episcopal Church). From “My Book of the Church’s Year” by Enid M. Chadwick.
University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann (above) was rated the most powerful person in the City of Philadelphia by “Philadelphia Magazine” in their April 2014 issue.  According to the article, “when Penn speaks everyone listens.”

University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann (above) was rated the most powerful person in the City of Philadelphia by “Philadelphia Magazine” in their April 2014 issue.  According to the article, “when Penn speaks everyone listens.”

Ivy League Ups and (Yes) Downs

The University of Pennsylvania saw the greatest increase in applications, up 14.4% for the Class of 2018.  Because of this the acceptance rate was only 9.9%—the lowest in University history.  Dear Old Penn is getting more popular by the year.

This Spring Fling Weekend let’s not forget the University of Pennsylvania's “I'm Schmacked” video from two years ago…

(Source: ivyprepster)